Texas A&M conducts cantaloupe, honeydew research

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Honeydew

To understand changes in the melon industry — cantaloupe, honeydew and other varieties, but not watermelon — Texas A&M University is conducting a survey to gather information about all aspects of the industry.

The goal is to establish the needs and perceptions of melon stakeholders — consumers, producers and retailers, according to Bhimu Patil, director of the Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center at Texas A&M and the project’s director.

“The outcome will help to develop new cultivars and varieties to make sure our research and outreach efforts will focus on the stakeholder needs and re-establish melon industry by developing domestic grown region-specific cultivars,” said Patil.

The center conducted similar surveys in 2009 and 2011. This year’s survey will help researchers understand if there are any changes in stakeholder needs concerning the melons, he said.

The survey will also shed light on changes in demands at all levels of the production chain.

“This year’s survey will help us to understand any changes in consumer, melon producer, retailer, national associations (such as the Produce Marketing Association, United Fresh Produce Association) needs,” Patil said. “Previous surveys provided strong evidence of developing flavorful, safer, healthy melons with disease resistance.”

Patil asks that all members of the melon industry, consumers, producers and retailers take the survey before the cutoff date of Feb. 23.

The survey, which is anonymous, takes about 8-10 minutes to complete, and is available at this website.

2017’s Fattest States in America

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https://wallethub.com/edu/fattest-states/16585/#bhimanagouda-s-patil

“Fat” is becoming the new normal in America. According to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than seven in 10 U.S. adults aged 20 and older are either overweight or obese. Rates are lower for children and adolescents but have risen steadily almost every year. So prevalent has America’s obesity problem grown that the weight-loss industry continues to expand. This year, Americans are expected to spend more than $68 billion just on programs designed to help them shed the extra pounds. The U.S. spends in total nearly $200 billion in annual health care costs related to obesity.

New findings by the Physical Activity Council suggest a need for more aggressive efforts to combat the issue. According to the report, nearly 81.5 million Americans aged 6 and older were completely inactive in 2016. Lack of physical activity is a leading cause of obesity, in addition to genetics, emotional instability and sleeplessness.

But the problem is bigger in some states than in others. To determine where obesity and overweight most dangerously persist, WalletHub’s analysts compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across 19 key metrics. Our data set ranges from share of obese and overweight population to sugary-beverage consumption among adolescents to obesity-related health care costs. Read on for our findings, expert commentary from a panel of researchers and a full description of our methodology.

For a more local perspective on the obesity and overweight problem in the U.S., check out WalletHub’s Fattest Cities report. Also to help spread awareness about diabetes, WalletHub assembled an interesting infographic exploring the impact of the disease as well as what folks are doing to fight back.

Source: WalletHub

Most & Least Obese States
Although this report examines the prevalence of obesity, it also evaluates the levels of inactivity and overweight in each state. However, given the particularly harmful effects of obesity, we constructed a separate table below that focuses just on obesity rates to highlight the states in which the problem is most concerning. Both adults and children were considered for this separate ranking. A rank of No. 1 corresponds with the highest obesity rate.

Source: WalletHub

Ask the Experts
Our collective medical tab of nearly $200 billion is just one of the consequences of a perpetually unhealthy lifestyle that leads to obesity. To shed more light on the issue and find solutions that consumers and local governments can follow, we asked a panel of experts to share their thoughts on the following key questions:

What are some tips for eating healthy without breaking the bank?
What are the biggest mistakes people make when trying to lose weight?
What policies should government pursue to combat obesity and rein in the cost of health care?
What is the impact of obesity on the economy and worker productivity?
Should overweight people pay a higher premium for their health insurance? Do you think they will in the future, based on recent health care proposals?

AgriLife researchers receive $4.4 million USDA grant

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TAMU research strives to improve food industry – @bowerman_rachel
TAMU AgriLife received funds for agricultural research involving the melon industry.

In the U.S. melons such as cantaloupe and honeydew have been associated with the outbreak of 36 foodborne diseases and pathogen related fruit recalls since 1990 according to Texas A&M horticulturalist Bhimu Patil.

On Sept. 8, scientists with the A&M AgriLife Research department received a $4.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to research and improve the U.S. melon industry.

The department received $35 million have been awarded nationally by the USDA to 12 projects across the country seeking to address the concerns of melon safety. The grant was awarded to the university’s horticultural sciences department as a part of a four year funded project, entitled “A Sustainable, Systems-based Approach for a Safer and Healthier Melon Supply Chain in the U.S..”

Bhimu Patil, a horticultural sciences professor and director of the AgriLife Research department’s Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center (VFIC), will head the project of collaborators from universities across the nation.

“VFIC has been successful in teaching initiatives to increase awareness and effectively disseminate solutions to target audiences,” Patil said. “A&M’s VFIC scientists will lead the nation partnering with melon growing states in the country.”

The money was awarded to the university after the USDA-NIFA recognized the VFIC as a Center For Excellence in the field of U.S. melon research.

NIFA Centers for Excellence are recognized by their success in developing beneficial public-private partnerships and efforts in the fields of research and education, according to the Department of Agriculture website.

In an email NIFA spokesperson Sonny Ramaswamy laid out the goals of his organization.

“NIFA investments in specialty crop research provide high-tech solutions to the needs of farmers and processors,” Ramaswamy wrote. “They foster a competitive U.S. industry that offers abundant, nutritious, safe, and affordable food sources.”

Ramaswamy feels that Texas A&M University researchers play a role in pursuing NIFA’s goals.

“These projects include a Texas A&M University effort to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the United States, emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven need,” Ramaswamy wrote.

Patil said that, due to their physical characteristics, melons are particularly susceptible to the spread of disease.

“The surfaces of these fruits are harder to wash,” Patil said. “And thus pathogens, such as salmonella, can accumulate on the outside and contaminate the flesh when the fruit is cut.”

Patil feels these issues need to be addressed because, despite the risk of disease, melons are incredibly beneficial and durable fruits.

“Melons have a multitude of health benefits and excellent flavor aspects for consumers, and as well as a good resistance to disease while growing in fields,” Patil said.

Patil also said the goals of the project will affect many areas of agricultural industry.

“The long term goal of this multidisciplinary project is to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the U.S., emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs,” Patil said.

According to Patil, the project will involve around twelve scientists from the VFIC who will partner with melon growers across the nation to improve melon safety and assist U.S. melon farmers to make the business more lucrative.

“We are developing varieties based on consumer needs,” Patil said. “We have more than 23 scientists in seven states collaborating to make this happen.”

Improving U.S. melon crop focus of $4.4 million study

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Texas A&M Today News

Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife

COLLEGE STATION — More than $4.4 million is being funded to discover ways to improve the U.S. melon industry through a grant to scientists with Texas A&M AgriLife Research and in seven other states.
The monies, provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, were part of $35 million given to 12 projects to find “science-based solutions and new technology for the specialty crop industry.”
The four-year project, “A Sustainable, Systems-based Approach for a Safer and Healthier Melon Supply Chain in the U.S.,” will be led by Dr. Bhimu Patil, director of AgriLife Research’s Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center in College Station. It is believed to be the largest grant ever awarded within the Texas A&M University horticultural sciences department, where Patil is also a professor.
In announcing the funding, USDA-NIFA director, Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, said, “NIFA investments in specialty crop research provide high-tech solutions to the needs of farmers and processors. They foster a competitive U.S. industry that offers abundant, nutritious, safe, and affordable food sources.”
He said that is why the AgriLife Research effort to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the U.S., emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs, was awarded.
Patil said that since 1990, cantaloupes have been associated with 36 U.S. foodborne disease outbreaks and pathogen-based recalls predominantly linked to salmonella.
The research will focus on cantaloupe and honeydew, Patil said, because the surface area of these fruits are such that they are harder to wash and thus pathogens can accumulate on the outside and contaminate the flesh when cut.
But cantaloupes also have a lot of healthy aspects for consumers and a lot of resistance to disease while growing in fields, he said.
“We are interested in developing varieties based on consumer needs,” he said. “And we have more than 20 scientists in seven states collaborating to make this happen.”
Patil and the team will conduct consumer evaluations and conduct sensory panels to consider what is desired in the fruit. They also will work with growers and grocery store chains to initiate and continue dialogue about what is desired in developing new, healthier varieties.
“The long-term goal of this multidisciplinary project is to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the U.S., emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs,” Patil added. “It will be advantageous for both groups.”

Improving U.S. melon crop focus of $4.4 million study

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Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife Communications Updated 8:04 am, Wednesday, September 6, 2017

COLLEGE STATION — More than $4.4 million is being funded to discover ways to improve the U.S. melon industry through a grant to scientists with Texas A&M AgriLife Research and in seven other states.
The monies, provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, were part of $35 million given to 12 projects to find “science-based solutions and new technology for the specialty crop industry.”
The four-year project, “A Sustainable, Systems-based Approach for a Safer and Healthier Melon Supply Chain in the U.S.,” will be led by Dr. Bhimu Patil, director of AgriLife Research’s Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center in College Station. It is believed to be the largest grant ever awarded within the Texas A&M University horticultural sciences department, where Patil is also a professor.
In announcing the funding, USDA-NIFA director, Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, said, “NIFA investments in specialty crop research provide high-tech solutions to the needs of farmers and processors. They foster a competitive U.S. industry that offers abundant, nutritious, safe, and affordable food sources.”
He said that is why the AgriLife Research effort to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the U.S., emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs, was awarded.
Patil said that since 1990, cantaloupes have been associated with 36 U.S. foodborne disease outbreaks and pathogen-based recalls predominantly linked to salmonella.
The research will focus on cantaloupe and honeydew, Patil said, because the surface area of these fruits are such that they are harder to wash and thus pathogens can accumulate on the outside and contaminate the flesh when cut.
But cantaloupes also have a lot of healthy aspects for consumers and a lot of resistance to disease while growing in fields, he said.
“We are interested in developing varieties based on consumer needs,” he said. “And we have more than 20 scientists in seven states collaborating to make this happen.”
Patil and the team will conduct consumer evaluations and conduct sensory panels to consider what is desired in the fruit. They also will work with growers and grocery store chains to initiate and continue dialogue about what is desired in developing new, healthier varieties.
“The long-term goal of this multidisciplinary project is to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the U.S., emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs,” Patil added. “It will be advantageous for both groups.”

Improving US melon crop focus of $4.4 million study at Texas A&M AgriLife Research

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COLLEGE STATION — More than $4.4 million is being funded to discover ways to improve the U.S. melon industry through a grant to scientists with Texas A&M AgriLife Research and in seven other states.

Cantaloupe in a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study near Amarillo.

The monies, provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, were part of $35 million given to 12 projects to find “science-based solutions and new technology for the specialty crop industry.”

The four-year project, “A Sustainable, Systems-based Approach for a Safer and Healthier Melon Supply Chain in the U.S.,” will be led by Dr. Bhimu Patil, director of AgriLife Research’s Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center in College Station. It is believed to be the largest grant ever awarded within the Texas A&M University horticultural sciences department, where Patil is also a professor.

In announcing the funding, USDA-NIFA director, Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, said, “NIFA investments in specialty crop research provide high-tech solutions to the needs of farmers and processors. They foster a competitive U.S. industry that offers abundant, nutritious, safe, and affordable food sources.”

He said that is why the AgriLife Research effort to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the U.S., emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs, was awarded.

Patil said that since 1990, cantaloupes have been associated with 36 U.S. foodborne disease outbreaks and pathogen-based recalls predominantly linked to salmonella.

The research will focus on cantaloupe and honeydew, Patil said, because the surface area of these fruits are such that they are harder to wash and thus pathogens can accumulate on the outside and contaminate the flesh when cut.

But cantaloupes also have a lot of healthy aspects for consumers and a lot of resistance to disease while growing in fields, he said.

“We are interested in developing varieties based on consumer needs,” he said. “And we have more than 20 scientists in seven states collaborating to make this happen.”

Patil and the team will conduct consumer evaluations and conduct sensory panels to consider what is desired in the fruit. They also will work with growers and grocery store chains to initiate and continue dialogue about what is desired in developing new, healthier varieties.

“The long-term goal of this multidisciplinary project is to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the U.S., emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs,” Patil added. “It will be advantageous for both groups.”

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NIFA Invests $35 Million in Specialty Crop Research

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USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture sent this bulletin at 08/24/2017 01:14 PM EDT

WASHINGTON, D.C. August 24, 2017 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced 12 new grants totaling $35 million for science-based solutions and new technology for the specialty crop industry. Funding is made through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI), authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill.

“Specialty crops generally fetch high value for the farmers, but require more intensive farming than conventional crops, such as wheat or corn,” said NIFA Director Sonny Ramaswamy. “NIFA investments in specialty crop research provide high-tech solutions to the needs of farmers and processors. They foster a competitive U.S. industry that offers abundant, nutritious, safe and affordable food sources.”

Specialty crops are defined as fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, and horticulture and nursery crops, including floriculture. The Specialty Crop Research Initiative seeks to invest in long-term solutions that address problems in the overlapping systems of production, distribution and processing, and consumers and markets. This research initiative encourages collaboration, open communication, the exchange of information, and the development of resources that accelerate application of scientific discovery and technology to help U.S. producers be more competitive in a global market.

The new recipients of fiscal year 2017 grants are:

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, $2,447,432
University of California, Santa Cruz, California, $2,513,040
University of California, Davis, California, $4,494,490
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, $2,538,539
University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, $45,470
Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, $3,208,657
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, $5,485,292
Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, $6,550,976
Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, $4,409,547
Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, $3,279,861
Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, $46,550
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, $46,550
These projects include a Texas A&M University effort to enhance the sustainability and profitability of melon production in the United States, emphasizing consumer preferences and industry-driven needs. The University of Arkansas is leading a multi-state and multi-agency collaboration to meet growing consumer demand for spinach by developing new, disease-resistant cultivars and conducting outreach to industry stakeholders.

NIFA has invested more than $400 million through the SCRI program to date. Among past projects, a University of Maryland project developed a wireless irrigation system to save water, increase efficiency, and reduce the environmental impacts of ornamental plant production practices. Michigan State University led a multi-year, public-private collaboration to develop region- and crop-specific pollination management approaches using both wild and managed native bees. The Integrated Crop Pollination project has resulted in resources for growers, research publications, and has helped growers increase yield with lower production costs.

More information on these projects is available on the NIFA website.

NIFA’s mission is to invest in and advance agricultural research, education, and extension that solve societal challenges. NIFA’s investments in transformative science directly support the long-term prosperity and global preeminence of U.S. agriculture. To learn more about NIFA’s impact on agricultural sciences, visit www.nifa.usda.gov/Impacts, sign up for email updates or follow us on Twitter @USDA_NIFA, #NIFAImpacts.

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USDA is an equal opportunity lender, provider, and employer.

Science Of Stink: Blame Sulfur Compounds For Your Garlic Breath

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Maanvi Singh June 21, 201410:48 AM ET

Garlic is delicious. But if you consume enough of it, its stench can repel not only vampires but any person within a 5-foot radius.

What’s behind garlic breath that makes it so offensive? In a video, the folks at the American Chemical Society and the chemistry blog Compound Interest lay out the chemicals responsible for the odor.

Chopping or crushing garlic releases the compound allicin, which then breaks down into four other smelly compounds. The most mischievous of them is allyl methyl sulfide, which can linger in your body for a long time. It not only causes your breath to go rank, but as it seeps into your bloodstream, it also gets into your sweat and pee.

It can be incredibly difficult to get rid of the stench once you’ve ingested this chemical. “Humans and animals are exquisitely sensitive to the most tiny amounts of sulfur compounds,” says Eric Block, a professor of chemistry at the State University of New York in Albany, and the author of Garlic and Other Alliums.

It makes our mouth water, but it makes our breath stink.
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Once you metabolize these compounds, the smell goes away, Block tells The Salt. But that can take a while — up to two days, though it varies in each person.

Some people can break it down quickly, but “I’m not one of those,” he says. “I’m a garlic lover, and my wife — who has an excellent sense of smell — says even 48 hours after eating a garlic meal, she can smell it on my skin.”

Some research suggests that the fat in milk may help us break down the allyl methyl sulfide more quickly. The ACS video also suggests parsley.

But these sorts of remedies may be iffy, Block says; instead he recommends masking garlic with other strong smells.

Citrus can help, says Bhimu Patil, a horticulturist at Texas A&M University, but that’s based on anecdotal evidence.

Garlic — especially when it’s eaten raw — is good for you, Patil says. “Maybe eat it at night,” he says. “That way you can also lead a social life.”

But if you’re gorging on garlic because you think it’ll quash your cold or reduce your risk of getting cancer, don’t get your hopes up too much.

Some preliminary studies show that garlic’s antimicrobial properties may benefit our health, Patil says. And epidemiological studies that look at countries where people consume a lot of garlic suggest that it may reduce the risk of developing cancer.

But, he says, “We need to do more analysis. We need to really understand the role of these compounds in garlic — both good and bad.”

And since garlic is so pungent, most of us probably don’t eat enough to actually reap any major health benefits, Block says.

It does stop the spread of disease in at least one way, though, Block says. “As I once heard a comedian say, by eating garlic you’ll have such bad breath that no one wants to come near you.”

Experts on medicinal plants to gather at Clemson University conference

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Denise Attaway, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences; Public Service and Agriculture

CLEMSON — Researchers from all over the world will convene at Clemson University for the eighth annual conference of the American Council for Medicinally Active Plants (ACMAP) to talk about how plants can be used to help fight diseases, provide proper nutrition and much more.

Jeffrey Adelberg, Clemson horticulturist, talks about echinacea grown at Gaia Herbs in Brevard, North Carolina.
Image Credit: Denise Attaway / Clemson University

The ACMAP conference takes place June 20-23 at the Madren Center. Jeffrey Adelberg, a Clemson horticulture professor and conference organizer, said its aim is to teach people about plants that are considered to have specific healing properties and more.

“We have a great lineup of presenters who will speak on topics ranging from plant biotechnology and human health to plant bioactives for infectious diseases, plant nutrition and so on,” Adelberg said. “These speakers are from globally recognized research institutions, while some are growers and some are practitioners. All will share information about their work with medicinal plants and functional foods.”

Topics to be covered include plant biotechnology and human health, traditional knowledge and healing practices, plant bioactives for disease prevention and management, nutrition and more. (Click here for conference agenda)

Speakers include:
Jim Simon from Rutgers University, who will talk about his studies of African botanicals and medicinal plants;

Bhimu Patil from Texas A&M University will speak on “Healthy functional foods: Effects of processing and storage on health-promoting molecules”;

Toni Kutchan of the Donald Danforth Center will talk about “Production of terpenes in Camelina sativa oilseed”;

Mark Hamann from the Medical University of South Carolina will chair a session on “Transforming traditional botanical medicines into precision medicines”;

Kalidas Shetty from North Dakota State University will speak about “Metabolic innovations for food microbiome to advance global food security and health”;

Mark Blumenthal of the American Botanical Council will talk about “Adulteration and fraud in the global herbal marketplace”; and

Kevin Zhou of Wayne State University will talk about “Development of grape skin components for diabetes management.”

An herbal workshop, featuring Phyllis Light, fourth-generation herbalist and healer, is scheduled from 1-4 p.m. Tuesday, June 20. Folk medicine techniques and Southern Appalachian Folk Medicine will be addressed during this workshop.

Also on Tuesday, conference participants will have an opportunity to visit the South Carolina Botanical Garden and have dinner with director Patrick McMillan, who also hosts “Expeditions with Patrick McMillian.”

A bus tour Friday will take conference participants to Gaia Herbs in Brevard, North Carolina; the North Carolina Arboretum in Asheville; and Mushroom Mountain in Easley.

A poster session will be held for students and postdoctoral research associates to present their research in a competition for cash prizes.

This conference is for educational purposes only, Adelberg said. People should always consult with their personal doctor or medical professional regarding any specific health concerns or questions they may have about using medicinal plants.

Visit https://www.acmap.org/conference-registration-2017 for registration and other conference information.

Bhimu Patil receives the Healthy Living Lifetime Achievement Award

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By Kathleen Phillips 

Dr. Bhimu Patil (Texas A&M AgriLife photo)

COLLEGE STATION Dr. Bhimu Patil, director of the Texas A&M University Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center in College Station, received the 2017 Healthy Living Lifetime Achievement Award at the Viva Fresh Produce Expo in Austin April 21.

The Healthy Living Lifetime Achievement Award is given to “individuals whose careers have demonstrated leadership with industry stakeholders and made substantial contributions to the advancement of science or promotion of produce for health through educational activities.”

The award was presented to Patil during the Viva Fresh Produce Expo luncheon, attended by more than 1,200 industry member participants from the U.S., Canada and Mexico. He is the third recipient of this prestigious award, following Dr. David Katz of the Yale University Prevention Research Center in 2015, and Dr. Drew Ramsey of Columbia University, New York, in 2016.

In addition to his role with the Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center, Patil is a professor of horticultural sciences. He was cited in his award nomination for “devoting his career to understanding the roles of health-promoting factors in plant-based foods and promoting the consumption of fresh, healthful and delicious varieties of fruits and vegetables.”

Patil’s multi-disciplinary research spans all aspects of fruit and vegetable production, from characterization of health-promoting compounds to plant breeding aimed to develop improved varieties. He is also involved in developing post-harvest handling practices that will prevent soil-borne contamination of produce.

During the last 20 years of his career, Patil has worked with diverse stakeholders, including producers, retailers, wholesalers, processors and seed companies.

“Dr. Patil has been an important asset to the Texas produce industry. Through his leadership at the VFIC, he and his team have helped develop safer, healthier and tastier fruits and vegetables. This in turn helps Texas producers succeed in the marketplace as they deliver healthful produce items to our dinner tables,” said Bret Erickson, president of Texas International Produce Association in Mission.

Patil is currently section chair for medicinal and aromatic plants in the International Society for Horticultural Sciences and has served as an international advisory board member for nine professional societies. He has published 170 peer-reviewed journal articles and has given more than 120 invited presentations at land grant institutions, professional societies, commodity groups and other organizations.

Among his awards are the Distinguished Service Award from the American Chemical Society-Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the Outstanding Graduate Educator Award from the American Society for Horticultural Sciences and the Outstanding Achievement Research Award from the Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Four professional societies have recognized Patil as a Fellow, a title bestowed on those who have made exceptional contributions to research and academia.

Patil also was cited for his mission, which “encompasses education and outreach to colleagues, students, producers and the general public.”

He co-founded an International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables, a global, biennial conference that draws researchers from almost 40 countries to share their latest findings on enhancing the healthy aspects of fruits and vegetables. He also served as chair of the Division of Agriculture and Food Chemistry of the American Chemical Society and chair or co-chair for 25 national and international symposia.

With U.S. Department of Agriculture support, he developed two multi-disciplinary and multi-state first-of-their-kind courses, “Science of Foods for Health” and “Phytochemicals in Fruits and Vegetables to Improve Human Health.”

Patil’s “passion for promoting fruits and vegetables as foods for health and his stakeholder-driven mission to improve agriculture for growers, processors, retailers and consumers has helped to improve the agriculture economy and human health in Texas and around the globe,” according to the award citation.